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When to cover an “honour with an honour”

Our second deal from the Parliament versus British Ladies match at the House of Commons last summer saw an indiscretion from the Parliamentarian sitting East.

North Deals
None Vul
3
10 9 8 6
A Q 5
10 9 6 5 2
J 9 7 6 2
7 5 3
J 8 6 4
A
N
W   E
S
A 10 4
J 4 2
10 9 7 2
Q J 4
 
K Q 8 5
A K Q
K 3
K 8 7 3
East South West North
  2 NT Pass 3 ♣
Pass 3 ♠ Pass 3 NT
Pass Pass Pass

 

North used the Stayman convention (3 ♣) to ask for four card majors. He settled for the Notrump game after South showed the wrong one (♠s). Put off the ♠ lead, West led  4. Winning dummy’s  Q, ♣ 10 was led and the spotlight turned to East.
Declarer was intending to play his ♣ K whatever East played, as indeed he did against the British Lady team, whose player sitting East had smoothly played low. ♣ K lost to West’s ♣ A and  6 was continued. Winning  K, declarer led ♣ 8 to East’s ♣ J. East played  10 to dummy’s  A, won ♣ 6 return with ♣ Q, led  9 to West’s  J, and won ♠ 6 return with ♠ A to defeat the contract.
But the Parliamentarian East injudiciously covered ♣ 10 with ♣ J. Declarer played ♣ K and West won ♣ A and played  6. Winning  K, declarer drove out ♣ Q with ♣ 8, won  10 return with dummy’s  A, cashed  AKQ, cashed dummy’s ♣s and established  10, and conceded the last trick to ♠ A. 10 easy tricks.

ANDREW’S TIP: Do not automatically cover an honor with an honour – unless it will promote a lower card for the partnership.

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